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Semite Times: The Bible In Palindromes

Dumb mud
“Madam, I’m Adam”
Eve damned Eden, mad Eve
Cain: a maniac

Egad, no bondage!
“Live not on evil!”

Repel a leper

Are we not drawn onwards, we Jews, drawn onward to new era?

Now, sir, a war is won
Egad! A base life defiles a bad age.

So – let’s use Jesus’ telos.
Dogma: I am God!
Deliverer re-reviled
“Abba, abba…”
Did I do, O God, did I as I said I’d do? Good, I did.

Won’t I panic in a pit now?

(most of these palindromes are not original to me, but I cannot find good attributions)

(I apologize for skipping the Pauline epistles, but I couldn’t find or invent good palindromes to describe them. But if we follow most scholars in rejecting 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus, and Ephesians, then modern commentary on the Pauline epistles could be “some men interpret nine memos”)

(I realize the title “Semite Times” might lead one to expect a more general history of the Jews beyond the Biblical period. I cannot do this concept justice, but a good chunk of modern Israeli history could be “bar an Arab”)

(Sounds Biblical as heck but unfortunately doesn’t seem to correspond to any actual Bible story: “So may Obadiah, even in Nineveh, aid a boy, Amos”.)

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16 Responses to Semite Times: The Bible In Palindromes

  1. Vaniver says:

    Did I do, O God, did as I said I’d do? Good, I did.

    When I invert this, I get:

    Did I do, o God, did I as I sad I’d do? Good, I did.

    So not quite a palindrome.

  2. Douglas Knight says:

    Are we not drawn onward, we Jews, drawn onward to new era?

    The s breaks this as a palindrome. I suppose you could add it to the first “onward,” but that would be weird.

  3. Daniel H says:

    I like “So – let’s use Jesus’ telos”. It even matches the apostrophes, even if it doesn’t match the spaces or the dash.

    Couldn’t “[deed]” and “[tenet]” together summarize most things?

  4. AJD says:

    In honor of Purim next weekend, the book of Esther:

    Xerxes: sex rex.
    “I aced romp, Mordecai!”
    “Yet I, Haman, am a hit, ey?”
    Doom-sore Hadassah has sad: a hero’s mood.
    “Deliver! Susa has us reviled!”
    —”Oh? Who?”
    —”Sure! Us, Ahasuerus!”
    Now is we Jews’ “I won!”

  5. g says:

    I shall now reveal to you the Secret Gnosis which (so I infer from many years on the internet) is known to Christians and to ex-Christians, but to no one else:

    The last book of the Christian bible is called “Revelation”, not “Revelations”.

    • David Hart says:

      I also find it amusing that the word ‘revelation’ means in Latin exactly the same thing that the word ‘apocalypse’ means in Greek (in both cases, literally ‘uncovering’), but what they now mean in English is so wildly divergent.

      • someone says:

        Divergent indeed…except in referring to the book itself, whose full title in English is actually “Revelation, or the Apocalypse”. (And other languages use cognates of “apocalypse” to name the book.)

  6. cornflower says:

    Another bandit’s cross drags east for Golgotha. He is Jesus, King. Lesser men, not one penitent, quietly raise somehow this ugly, vainly wicked X. Yesterday’s zealot.

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